Unexpected variety among small inner satellites of Saturn

Post by Peter Thomas, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

 Small satellites (< 150 km mean radius) usually resemble potatoes. Their irregular shapes are formed by a history of impact cratering without the benefit of internally-driven processes of volcanism, tectonics, or atmospheric effects (Castillo-Rogez et al., 2012).  During its 9 years orbiting Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft has shown that the small satellites orbiting close to Saturn have a variety of shapes, most of which deviate from the expected familiar battered potato appearance.  These objects are likely dominated by water ice as determined from mean densities and spectroscopy (Thomas et al., 2010; Buratti et al. 2010).  Satellites within rings have equatorial ridges (Charnoz et al. 2007; Porco et al., 2007).  Others, such as Janus and Epimetheus, the “co-orbitals” are almost lunar-like in appearance, close to the expected potato variety.

Image 1: Best available view of Helene. N1687119756, UV3 filter, phase = 97°, sub-spacecraft point is 2.7°N, 124.8°W.  North is down in this presentation.  Taken June 18, 2011.

Image 1: Best available view of Helene. N1687119756, UV3 filter, phase = 97°, sub-spacecraft point is 2.7°N, 124.8°W. North is down in this presentation. Taken June 18, 2011.

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